Sunday, June 28, 2009

DEW EVAPORATES

we finally have some sun today and it is warm. however, last week, the grasses bore more crystal chandeliers...joe joe in front of salvia 'hot lips.' in an earlier post i noted that the flower variegation was not in evidence - but it has now appeared as the plant has matured! who knew?
here you can see why it's called 'hot lips.'
clematis viticella 'pupurea plena.' can you see all the miniscule dew drops?
here it is on the fence...
now to the potager, where the nasturtiums are having the run of the place...
i have just replanted a few things to replace the carrots and lettuce...
a view through the gate and fence...
i have harvested many carrots so far. the purple carrots are 'dragon' carrots, but i think the plain old st. valery carrots have a better flavor.
clematis viticella 'julia correvon,' growing up the deer fence.
the big leaf magnolia is so happy this year, i do hope it will bloom next spring.
first daylily of the season... the deer have allowed me some buds this year, as greenery is plentiful in the woods...
the alliums are just putting a toe out to see if it's warm enough to bloom...

5 comments:

JIm/ArtofGardening said...

No matter the flavor of carrot, they make for a great photo.

Yolanda Elizabet Heuzen said...

Love the shot of the carrots, it's very cute, almost as cute as JoeJoe. Very envious of your clematis purpurea plena, it's gorgeous.

Your kitchen garden is looking better and better, well done you!!!

Su Chua Phin 徐蔡斌 said...

I am very impressed with your harvest, aren't those carrots lovely :P

em said...

jim, thanks, maybe i'll include carrots in all my photos! thanks for the comment!

ye, thanks for stopping by! i agree, joe joe is very cute...

su chua phin, thanks! i wish i could send them all for everyone to try!

Sophie Munns said...

OOH! I like your blog. Have added you to my blog list so i can see how your garden grows!
seriously though, I love the rarer plants you are finding...such a delight... although I do have a perrenial fondness for nasturtium which i would love to know how different they are to ones found here. I have spent the past 2 tuesdays visiting the Botanical Garden in the Australian City I live in. I've been volunteering on a seed saving project in conjunction with Kew Gardens in the UK and Botanical Gardens in Africa, Australia and parts of Sth America. Rare Indigenous species are the focus. It has extended my appreciation for bio-diversity so much seeing and hearing more about what is occuring... in the company of others.
So I shall enjoy your posts!
Sophie